Monthly Archives: July 2017

The Tenets of Physical Ergonomics

 

The study of ergonomics focuses on the manner in which people interact with the various furniture and tools they use in their respective work environments. Since the purpose of these studies is to find ways to promote sustained worker satisfaction, a great deal of emphasis is placed on physical comfort. Fortunately, you don’t have to be a seasoned biomedical engineer to improve the ergonomics of your work environment. If you’re experiencing comfort issues at your place of business, there are a number of steps you can take to remedy the situation on your own.

Neutral Posture

Neutral posture is achieved when a body is balanced and aligned while sitting or standing. This ensures that minimal stress is applied to assorted muscles, tendons and bones and that one’s joints are able to remain aligned. In the interest of workplace comfort, it’s strongly recommended that you maintain neutral posture throughout the workday. Neutral posture’s polar opposite is awkward posture. As the name suggests, awkward posture is associated with putting heavy stress on one’s joints and bones. Additionally, awkward posture often entails an extreme range of motion. Since consistently adopting an awkward posture can have negative long-term effects on the musculoskeletal system, workers should make a conscious effort to avoid it. For more information on neutral posture vs. awkward posture, head over to OH&S’s website.

Regular Movement

In order to maintain healthy and flexible joints, it’s imperative that you engage in regular movement and stretching. However, this can prove difficult when working a job that requires constant sitting. With this in mind, make a point of performing basic stretches every few hours throughout the workday. As you’ll find, a little bit of exercise can go a long way in keeping your joints nice and flexible.

Good Lighting

Poorly-lit workplaces have been shown to increase job stress and general unease in workers, ultimately making them very uncomfortable. Bad lighting can be particularly problematic for workers who suffer from vision problems. On the flipside, workplaces with good lighting tend to have higher rates of productivity and employee satisfaction.

Originating in the 1950s, ergonomics remains a popular area of study for biomedical engineers – and for good reason. Finding ways to promote workplace comfort is very important for people who work in physically demanding professions. Even if you’ve never studied biomedical engineering, there are simple yet effective measures you can take to improve the ergonomics in your work environment.